An Old Friend For New Times

We’re all familiar with the scenario where a good kid gets involved with the wrong crowd and ends up being punished. Even if he didn’t do anything wrong, his association with the perpetrators was enough to land him in a heap of trouble. And sometimes, even the purported foe and his associates didn’t do anything wrong but were in the wrong place, at the wrong time in history.

This is the story of hemp.

EARLY YEARS

Hemp, the good kid on the block, was demonized seventy-seven years ago because of family ties with his little brother cannabis jr. You see, little brother cannabis has the unique ability to elevate folk’s moods because of a compound called ( (6aR,10aR)-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol) otherwise known as THC. Many that shared in little cannabis gave him enduring nicknames such as marijuana, weed, bud, dope, ganja, maryjane, bhang, and sinsemilla. Cannabis jr. was a hit within societies across the globe and sparked a revolution of products utilizing THC for all kinds of applications. Thus, cannabis jr. became the rock star of medicinal applications while big brother hemp fulfilled thousands of industrial needs including, but not limited to, paper, fuel oil, food, and up and coming new age plastics.

The Cannabis Sativa family, which houses both low THC hemp and high THC marijuana, was at the top of their game and had the world at their feet. They ruled for thousands of years, gifting societies across the planet with their unique industrial, medicinal, and nutritive traits.

Ironically, in a place that is supposed to be the bastion of freedom and liberty, it only took one-hundred-and-sixty-one years within The United States of America to outlaw one of Earth’s most versatile, gifted plants. Surprisingly, the ultimate target by American business tycoons within the Cannabis’ family was not cannabis jr., the medicinal rock star.

It would be his big brother hemp.

BEGINNING OF THE END

Hemp’s incredible yield of plant material per hectare, ease of maturation and cultivation, its product diversity across large market cap industries – paper, food, oil, and plastics – was a direct assault against a handful of powerful, monopolistic, American business tycoons. William Randolph Hearst, a newspaper tycoon, Andrew Mellon, one of DuPont’s largest investors and former Secretary of the Treasury to President Hoover, and Harry J. Anslinger, head of the Federal Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs, would lead the charge in a nationwide propaganda war to destroy the Cannabis Sativa families’ good name.

In 1931, at the bequest of Andrew Mellon, Harry Anslinger was assigned the position as head of the Federal Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs. After being sworn in, Hearst and Mellon realized the groundwork had been laid for the destruction of the cannabis family. Ideally, this would lead to further enrichment of Hearst and Mellon’s business empires.

Immediately, within a flurry of propagandizing dereliction, Hearst published articles in his widely popular New York Journal and San Francisco Examiner about marijuana smoking teens who became engorged with blood lust and murder. He would also oversee news pieces of how marijuana usage had a direct linkage to those committed to insane asylums. But his coup des gras would come nearly a year and a half after declaring war on the Cannabis Sativa family and his primary target: marijuana. Mr. Hearst’s biggest claim, which astonished and frightened millions of readers across the U.S., was that “three-quarters of all violent crimes within the United States was committed by dope slaves – a matter of cold, hard record.”

That single story shocked the United States into submission and would help seal the coffin of the Cannabis Sativa family for good.

DEATH NAIL

On August 2nd, 1937, after a brutal five-year propaganda campaign smearing marijuana,  Franklin Delano Roosevelt signed into law the Marijuana Tax Stamp Act which applied an abhorrently high tax on all Cannabis Sativa products. Growing hemp within the United States was the unspoken, intended target and was no longer fiscally feasible.

A HEMP HEARTBEAT

The Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2005, 2007, and 2009 all tried to amend The Controlled Substance Act of 1970, signed into law by President Richard Nixon, by excluding the illegality of cultivation and manufacturing of industrial hemp within the United States. All the bills failed to pass.

On January 8th, 2015 a revised bill named ” The Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2015″ (S.134) was introduced to the Senate by Ron Wyden of Oregon for review. As of January 29th, 2015, the bill has been read twice and referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. Here it currently lies, awaiting its fate.

It’s companion bill within the House of Representatives, H.R.525 “The Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2013,” was introduced two years earlier by Rep. Thomas Massie of Kentucky. Within the first half of 2013, the bill jumped through the hoops of five committees. That’s right, five committees! It has sat stalled for nearly two years awaiting review by the “Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations.”

If the Senate bill gains traction in 2015, it should resuscitate the stalled bill within the House.

COMMON GROUND

While pondering the question of industrial hemp’s legitimacy as a viable industrial crop, the following facts should be taken into serious consideration:

  • Under the proposed laws in the House and Senate, the hemp plant must contain equal or less than 0.3% THC, the psycho-active ingredient in all Cannabis Sativa L. varieties
    • Ingestion at these levels by any human would not induce “a high”
  • As of 2015, twenty-one states have removed barriers to industrial hemp’s production
    • CA, CO, DE, HI, IL, IN, KY, ME, MI, MO, MT, NE, NY, ND, OR, SC, TN, UT, VT, WA, WV
  • In 1938, Popular Mechanics once coined industrial hemp “A Billion Dollar Crop”
  • As of 2015, the plant is said to have upwards of 25,000 uses within society
  • Since 7,000 B.C., Cannabis Sativa L. has been illegal less than 1% of the time
    • That’s approximately 8,937 years of legality in a multitude of societies
  • The Declaration of Independence was drafted on hemp paper
  • The Virginia Company, by decree of King James I in 1619, ordered every colonist to grow 100 hemp plants specifically for export
  • George Washington grew hemp at Mount Vernon
  • Hemp has been found in pottery that is over 10,000 years old
  • Thomas Jefferson encouraged all inhabitants of the once young Republic known as The United States to grow hemp for economic vitality
  • Hemp fiber is stronger, more absorbent, longer, and more mildew-resistant than cotton fiber
  • Hemp seed oil contains the highest amount of omega-3 and 6 fatty acids when compared to all other seed oils
  • The United States is the number one consumer of hemp products on planet Earth but is the only industrialized nation not growing hemp
  • Hemp is most often grown without herbicides, fungicides, or pesticides
  • Hemp is a natural weed suppressor due to its dense canopies
  • The popular Levi jean was originally made from hemp
  • Ben Franklin owned a mill that made hemp paper
  • BMW is experimenting with hemp in its production of car materials
  • The original diesel engine was designed to run off hemp oil
  • Hemp that pollinates any nearby marijuana plant (higher THC variety) will always result in a lower THC variety, i.e. less potent if consumed thus making it less attractive as a drug
  • Hemp oil was once the dominate grease used in machinery
  • Unlike cotton based papers, hemp paper doesn’t yellow
  • Hemp growers will not have success cultivating marijuana within mixed fields due to differing growth constraints
  • Hemp can easily displace cotton which requires massive amounts of harmful chemicals and is extremely harmful to the environment
  • Fifty-percent of the world’s pesticides are sprayed on cotton
  • Hemp can be substituted for wood pulp in wood based products thus saving forests, preserving watersheds, and supporting wildlife habitat
  • Hemp can yield 3-8 tons of dry fiber per acre which is four (4x) times what an average forest can yield
  • Hemp can be made into fine quality papers
  • Hemp grows well in a variety of climate and soil types
  • A multitude of construction materials can be made out of hemp and replace traditional wood based products

IT’S UP TO YOU

If you believe America should allow the cultivation and manufacture of one of Earth’s most diverse plants, we must contact our Representatives and Senators showing support for industrial hemp. There has never been a better time for America’s need to kick-start its economy. Hemp can help in a very big way!

To assist you, I have drafted both a Senate and House template that you are more than welcome to use for emailing your state’s Senator and Representative within Congress. The called out red <text> is meant for substitution of information specific to you and your state.

After emailing your congressman, please call them in support of both S.134 (Senate bill) and H.R.525 (House bill).

For the Senate: The U.S. Capitol Switchboard number is (202) 224-3121. A switchboard operator will connect you directly with the Senate office you request.

For the House of Representatives: The U.S. Capitol Switchboard number is (202) 225-3121. A switchboard operator will connect you directly with the Representative’s office you request.

SENATE TEMPLATE

Senator <name>,

As a concerned citizen for the future of farming and manufacturing within the United States, I ask for your support of S.134 – a bill to amend the Controlled Substances Act to exclude industrial hemp from the definition of marijuana, and for other purposes.

HEMP VS. MARIJUANA
Industrial hemp IS NOT marijuana. They are two distinct plant species within the same plant family, and therefore, have different qualities. Unlike marijuana, industrial hemp’s concentration of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (a.k.a THC – the psychoactive component within the family of plants) are so minute, so insignificant that human consumption will not result in cerebral euphoria, a.k.a. “a high” or “getting high.” Alternatively, industrial hemp’s unique core qualities allow it to fulfill consumer/industrial needs where other plants and processes simply fail. It’s an irrefutable fact that industrial hemp not being excluded from The Controlled Substances Act of 1970 is an enormous disservice to the American people and a travesty against society.

AMERICAN ECONOMY
Industrial hemp would be a powerful mechanism that would assist in reviving the U.S. economy. History clearly demonstrates the amazing versatility of this plant in concert with societal/industrial consumption demands, its growth resiliency within a multitude of environments, the net positive outcome for local ecologies and the overall environment, its incredible sequestration rate of CO2 during growth, its ability to thrive outside of traditional growing seasons, its resiliency to many common crop pests, and its ability to provide over 25,000 uses within our modern society.

I believe all American consumers, who are adequately educated about the difference between industrial hemp and marijuana, support the legalization of cultivating and manufacturing industrial hemp within the United States of America.

I urge you to support S.134 “Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2015” and influence your peers to do the same. It’s long overdue Senator <name>!

I thank you for supporting S.134,
<your name here>

HOUSE TEMPLATE

Representative <name>,

As a concerned citizen for the future of farming and manufacturing within the United States, I ask for your support of H.R.525 – a bill to amend the Controlled Substances Act to exclude industrial hemp from the definition of marijuana, and for other purposes.

HEMP VS. MARIJUANA
Industrial hemp IS NOT marijuana. They are two distinct plant species within the same plant family, and therefore, have different qualities. Unlike marijuana, industrial hemp’s concentration of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (a.k.a THC – the psychoactive component within the family of plants) are so minute, so insignificant that human consumption will not result in cerebral euphoria, a.k.a. “a high” or “getting high.” Alternatively, industrial hemp’s unique core qualities allow it to fulfill consumer/industrial needs where other plants and processes simply fail. It’s an irrefutable fact that industrial hemp not being excluded from The Controlled Substances Act of 1970 is an enormous disservice to the American people and a travesty against society.

AMERICAN ECONOMY
Industrial hemp would be a powerful mechanism that would assist in reviving the U.S. economy. History clearly demonstrates the amazing versatility of this plant in concert with societal/industrial consumption demands, its growth resiliency within a multitude of environments, the net positive outcome for local ecologies and the overall environment, its incredible sequestration rate of CO2 during growth, its ability to thrive outside of traditional growing seasons, its resiliency to many common crop pests, and its ability to provide over 25,000 uses within our modern society.

I believe all American consumers, who are adequately educated about the difference between industrial hemp and marijuana, support the legalization of cultivating and manufacturing industrial hemp within the United States of America.

I urge you to support H.R. 525 “Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2013” and influence your peers to do the same. It’s long overdue Representative <name>!

I thank you for supporting H.R.525,
<your name here>

THANK YOU

As an equally concerned citizen for the United States of America, I thank you, the reader, for taking time to contact your congressman in support of these two bills. Legalizing the cultivation, manufacture, and distribution of industrial hemp within America is long overdue!

40 Responses So Far... Leave a Reply:

  1. Leroy says:

    I never knew that hemp and pot were different. Wow.

    • Matt says:

      Leroy,
      I’m glad that you now have an understanding of what makes the two plants different. This is an extremely important distinction and, unfortunately, has cost the U.S. dearly for nearly 80 years.

  2. Steve Kross says:

    Hey Matt,
    Those templates are fantastic and saved time for a worthwhile cause. I’ll pass them around if it’s okay with you.

    • Matt says:

      Steve,
      Be my guest! Thank you for the kind words and I appreciate you participating and exercising your civil duty!

  3. Shannon Ivile says:

    Thanks for explaining that hemp and marijuana are not exactly the same. It seems like a lot of confusion in society because they are often mixed up.

    Great work.

    • Matt says:

      Shannon,
      Yes, they are often mixed up. Example: After writing my congressman, he replied with a form letter concerning “marijuana.” Sad that still today many of our legislators really don’t care about the benefits that hemp could have to society. Most are bought off by big chemical and other conglomerates that would be threatened by hemp’s raw materials.

  4. Dwayne Minsk says:

    So it’s legal to grow in Canada, China, India, and other developed countries but to grow it here, it’s treated like a drug? Is that right?

    • Matt says:

      Yes, Dwayne, that’s right. One has to acquire a permit from the DEA to grow the cash crop of all crops! Now why should someone have to get the DEA involved to grow something that has almost zero psychoactive characteristics? Just goes to show how crony capitalism is stifling our economy and is ruling the day.

      The only way anything will ever change is for the citizenry to change.

      Thank you for the post!

  5. Millicent Carter says:

    I am unable to post this in the Success Stories for whatever reason, so I posted here. I was diagnosed with prostate cancer on October 18, 2013. I was advised by my doctor that my only options were to have radiation seeds implanted in my prostate or receive regular external beam radiation. I declined. I knew there had to be other options.
    I scoured the Internet and discovered a wealth of information about cannabis oil curing cancer. I was able to obtain some medical marijuana Dr. Ilamosi Williams (Cannabis Oil Cure) from it and consumed the recommended dosage by mid January.
    On January 26th I had a cancer reassessment which consisted of an MRI with a state of the art Tesla 3 MRI machine. Results – NO SIGN OF CANCER! CANCER FREE!
    One of the things that helped me while going through all this was reading the testimonials and the success stories of those who have used the oil and were cured And with good food diet. Now that this wonderful oil has cured me, I feel I need to let others know as well. Please feel free to contact me, ask anything should you like more information or directly contact Dr. Ilamosi Williams at: cannabis_oil_cure@outlook.com were i purchased from. Thank you, Millicent Carter ~

    • Matt says:

      Ms. Carter,
      Congratulations on your success in the fight against cancer. I am glad to hear that Cannabis Sativa/Indica helped you with this terrible disease.

      If you are interested, the system which has the most profound results in the fight against cancer is the Gerson Therapy. In my experienced opinion, it is the most scientifically proven treatment course without the use of any type of radiation. The basis of the therapy is toxicity reduction, offsetting nutritional deficiencies, and ultimately regaining homeostasis within the body.

      From their website: “The Gerson Therapy uses intensive detoxification to eliminate wastes, regenerate the liver, reactivate the immune system and restore the body’s essential defenses – enzyme, mineral and hormone systems.”

      I invite you to visit their website and learn more about how they defeat this horrendous disease in its many forms: http://gerson.org/. I, in no way shape or form, am paid to promote their services.

      Returning back to the topic of Cannabis Sativa L., which helped you with your ailments, it is my wish that Cannabis Hemp would take the forefront of discussion within American society. It is nothing more than a tragedy that the United States is not capitalizing on the numerous organic, renewable, and highly virtuous materials that can be created from this incredible industrial crop.

  6. Jim Lawrence says:

    Crap, man, great article! What stupidity we’re not growing this in the U.S.

    • Matt says:

      Wholly agreed. Obviously, logic is not the obstacle to its legalization. It’s the same ol’ drumbeat of money. The Crony Capitalism has morphed into some type of twisted Communistic ideals. Industrial Hemp is just one more symptom of a system gone off the rails.

  7. Gerry Felling says:

    H.R. 525 is stalled in the House. What gives?

    • Matt says:

      Because it’s not important to Congress men and women who vote to keep their constituents in power and favor within the economy. Given a fair and equal shot, hemp would ultimately outperform petroleum within the marketplace.

      That’s why it’s illegal. It’s a threat to big business.

  8. ttvlong says:

    At least there are live bills in congress. That’s a start.

    • Matt says:

      TT,
      Yes it is. Now if we could only get nationwide pressure put forth towards congress on these two federal bills.

  9. Deb Masters says:

    Aren’t you worried about the time of acceptance of this? I get that it used to be in American culture but now it has a stigma. Seems like a long, uproad battle, doesn’t it?

    • Matt says:

      What other choice do we, the ones who still care, have in this matter? No better time than now to energize the fight in both federal and state legislators concerning the legalization of Industrial Hemp!

  10. Matt O'Ryan says:

    Oil is king and for as long as American society is dependent upon it, hemp will stay illegal. You’re wasting your time promoting this plant.

    • Matt says:

      Key word, Matt, is “dependent” on oil as stated in your comment. Yes, a majority of items around us each and every day is constructed from petroleum. In turn, I see this an an enormous opportunity.

      How?

      Those everyday items are not permanent, forever. They break through oxidation or just plain wear out. This is where Hemp comes in. It provides the raw material, Hemp oil, that can be synthesized to create replacement products for those formally built from petroleum.

      History has already proven the value of Hemp and plastics. Henry Ford saw the value nearly 100 years ago. Lotus sees the value. It’s just a matter of time before industry sees all the upside to Hemp.

      It’s the future whether big oil likes it or not.

  11. fran8811 says:

    Backdoor to legalizing pot. Looking for some honesty, here.

    • Matt says:

      Not at all. In fact, I’d go so far as saying the hemp strain is much more important than all the other elevated THC strains combined. Taking into consideration the dire straits of the U.S., hemp could help.

  12. Ron Elder says:

    I am sick and tired of having to fight for things in society that shouldn’t be illegal. G** d*** tyrants!

    • Matt says:

      Thanks for fighting, Ron! Don’t quit. It’s the right thing to do and you know that you’ve given you’re all. It does matter!

  13. J. Dog says:

    TPTB don’t, and won’t, allow it.

  14. Tammy Kingston says:

    Thank you, Matt, for providing these templates. I have e-mailed congress. We need a surge of people to get these bills passed. Hope it happens!

    • Matt says:

      That surge of people needs to happen sooner than later. Safe to say that as each month passes, chaos is served is ever expanding proportions. Shove it down the people’s throats and they either swallow or choke.

      It’s getting serious.

  15. J.B. says:

    I didn’t know much about this plant. Always thought that weed, pot, hemp is all the same. I sure hope it becomes law. Seems to make sense.

    • Matt says:

      J.B.,
      Thank you for your comment and especially reiterating that weed and pot are different than hemp. The American culture is shifting and its time to communicate that hemp is not pot/marijuana. Time to take advantage of the shift in consciousness and get hemp “out of jail!”

  16. Theo Karner says:

    Hey Matt,
    Thanks for the templates. I have used both and have sent all I know the link to your page. Excellent work!

    -TK

  17. Josh Ryun says:

    Pretty nice post. I just stumbled upon your weblog and wished to mention that I have truly enjoyed surfing around your blog posts. After all I’ll be subscribing to your feed and I am hoping you write again soon!

    • Matt says:

      Josh,
      Thank you for visiting AceFrog and I’m pleased that the other articles within the site have met your satisfaction. Please feel free to question or support ideas presented. This blog’s mission is to promote a greater understanding within topics affecting all of us.

  18. Mark Lawrence says:

    Hemp isn’t maryjane but it still has THC. Yeah, it’s a low amount but I think our people that set law won’t be able to get past that fact.

    • Matt says:

      Mark,
      I appreciate your opinion but, thankfully, the tide is slowly changing with hemp’s brother: marijuana. As more states come on board with decriminalization of marijuana, why on Earth would those states not, and ultimately, the federal government not decriminalize hemp? I think lawmaker’s viewpoint on hemp will shift purely because of the economics. Every other develop nation on Earth grows industrial hemp except the U.S. How does that make any sense? It doesn’t, and therefore, horrendously unjust laws can’t stay on the books forever!

  19. Leeriku Tolento says:

    Is America ready to grow something that looks too similar to pot? Hell no! Ain’t going to happen acefrog.

    • Matt says:

      Leeriku,
      Valid point. But I ask you this – do you think crony capitalists are going to allow, a potential, trillion dollar crop be in the hands of the biggest grower on Earth forever? And who is that grower? None other than China.
      Financial war is at hand. If the U.S. doesn’t get serious about taking advantage of this dynamic plant, then we deserve what we get.

  20. Terri Johnson says:

    I never realized the power behind hemp. Very interesting article. Do you think there’s a chance that the bill’s will pass?

    • Matt says:

      Terri,
      I think there is a better chance for these bills to pass when measuring against previous year efforts. Why? Because of what WA/CO states did with hemp’s little brother: marijuana. Therefore, I believe we are witnessing a cultural shift in unsound drug policies AND those plants (hemp) that are collateral damage with these unjust laws.